Adults

Edit this pageBack to previous index

Table of contents

United Kingdom

Go to your GP and say that you are transgender. Some doctors are ignorant, so you need to make sure to explain what this means, and that you wish to transition your gender. Ask to be referred to a Gender Identify Clinic. Here is a list: http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/Transhealth/Pages/local-gender-identity-clinics.aspx

Some GPs are assholes. Report them if they are. And report the awesome ones.

Even with private care, you’ll still use your GP for a lot of things probably, including blood tests and endocrinologist referrals, unless you get those privately too. The following external website maintains a register of good and bad GPs:
http://transfigurations.org.uk/trans-friendly-doctors/

You should get a blood test BEFORE seeing an endocrinologist, and take your test results with you.

A trans person in the UK who had a bad bad GP spoke to their local elected MP and got her to write to the government. This letter from the UK Government’s Department of Health outlines GP requirements and states that they are required by law to immediately refer you to a gender clinic when you request gender transitioning services.

When you go to that GP, regardless of whether you think it will go well (most GPs are OK), take a printout of that letter with you just in case.

Thanks go to Gina Denham of the Transpire support group for sharing this letter.

Going about the process

If you live in or near London, the Charing Cross clinic is very good.

Be warned that the waiting lists at most clinics is about 2 years on average, for your first appointment. This is because attitudes have shifted in positive ways towards trans people, so more people these days are transitioning; this means that the NHS is under more strain. Funding hasn’t increased much, and the NHS isn’t equipped to handle a 500% increase in people transitioning over the last 5 years.

Private transitioning services should also be used simultaneously, if you can afford it. You can pay for it with health insurance, or you can self-fund it. You can use private care while on the NHS waiting list, and then ditch the private care once you are being treated by the NHS.

You will then later on receive a letter from that clinic. Give your details to that clinic, and make sure to book an appointment with them. Then wait for your appointment.

What to expect from UK NHS trans care:

There is gatekeeping on the NHS, but it’s light. However, expect long waiting times. You might be waiting 5 years from now, for surgery. And about 2-3 years for hormones.

We recommend using private care while on the NHS waiting list. Private services also have (lower) waiting lists, and you can DIY a lot of your transition before then (or if you can’t afford private care). For instance, refer to our HRT self-medication guide.

New Zealand

Go to your doctor and ask for gender transition services. You can get HRT prescribed by your doctor in New Zealand. TODO: add more information about procedures.


Edit this pageLicenseContributeConduct Guidelines

Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License Version 1.3 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation with no Invariant Sections, no Front Cover Texts, and no Back Cover Texts. A copy of this license is found in /fdl-1.3.html

For information on who owns what copyright on each page, in what years, refer to the Git repository that the site is hosted in, and check commit logs.